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10-18-16 Pasco Aquatic/Community Center Feasibility Study DRAFT MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 1 Section I – Demographic Summary & Market Review Ballard*King & Associates (B*K), in conjunction with Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture and Water Technology Inc., is tasked with completing a feasibility study for a possible new aquatic/recreation center for the Pasco Public Facilities District in Pasco, Washington. Demographics The following is a summary of the basic demographic characteristics of the identified service areas along with recreation and leisure participation standards as produced by the National Sporting Goods Association, also included is participation information produced by the National Endowment of the Arts. Service Areas: The primary goal of the proposed new aquatic/recreation center would be to serve the residents of Pasco, as a result the City (and the unincorporated area) has been identified as the Primary Service Area for the facility. Understanding that many times facilities and programs draw participants from beyond municipal boundaries, a Secondary Service Area has been determined that represents the Tri-Cities area and includes West Richland, Finley and Burbank. Primary Service Areas are defined as the distance people will travel on a regular basis (a minimum of once a week) to utilize a facility or its programs. Use by individuals outside of this area will be much more limited and will focus more on special activities or events (tournaments, etc.). Service areas can vary in size with the types of components in the facility. A center with active elements (pool, weight cardiovascular equipment area, gym, track, etc.) will have a larger service area than a more passively oriented facility. Specialized facilities such as a competitive aquatic venue will have a bigger service area, making it more of a regional destination. Service areas can flex or contract based upon a facility’s proximity to major thoroughfares. Other factors impacting the use as it relates to driving distance are the presence of alternative service providers in the service area. Alternative service providers can have an effect upon membership, daily admissions and the associated penetration rates for programs and services. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 2 Table A – Service Area Comparison Chart: Primary Service Area Secondary Service Area Population: 2010 Census 63,5201 219,2752 2015 Estimate 71,759 240,482 2020 Estimate 79,906 261,316 Households: 2010 Census 19,260 77,981 2015 Estimate 21,719 85,387 2020 Estimate 24,169 92,716 Families: 2010 Census 14,923 55,674 2015 Estimate 16,782 60,798 2020 Estimate 18,652 65,954 Average Household Size: 2010 Census 3.28 2.79 2015 Estimate 3.29 2.80 2020 Estimate 3.29 2.80 Ethnicity (2015 Estimate): Hispanic 53.9% 29.3% White 55.9% 73.4% Black 2.3% 1.9% American Indian 0.6% 0.9% Asian 2.1% 2.8% Pacific Islander 0.2% 0.2% Other 35.3% 16.8% Multiple 3.6% 4.0% Median Age: 2010 Census 27.7 32.9 2015 Estimate 28.5 33.6 2020 Estimate 28.8 34.4 Median Income: 2015 Estimate $51,330 $58,242 2020 Estimate $57,358 $68,749 1 From the 2000-2010 Census the Primary Service Area experienced a 72.6% increase in population. 2 From the 2000-2010 Census the Secondary Service Area experienced a 34.4% increase in population. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 3 Age and Income: It is important to compare the median age and median household income levels to the national levels. Age and income are primary determiners of participation in recreation activities. The lower the median age, the higher the participation rates are for most activities. The level of participation also increases as the median income level goes up. Table B – Median Age: 2010 Census 2015 Projection 2020 Projection Primary Service Area 27.7 28.5 28.8 Secondary Service Area 32.9 33.6 34.4 State of Washington 37.2 38.0 38.5 Nationally 37.1 37.9 38.6 Chart A – Median Age: The median age in the Secondary Service Area is lower than the U.S. number, with the Primary Service Area being even lower than the Secondary Service Area. This low median age points to the presence of families with children. This is important because children under the age of 17 are significant users of aquatic facilities. It also must be remembered that swimming as an activity reaches all age categories including retirees and seniors. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 2010 2015 2020 Ag e Primary Service Area Secondary Service Area State of Washington National MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 4 Households with Children: The following chart provides the number of households and percentage of households in the Primary Service Area and the Secondary Service Area with children. Table C – Households w/ Children Number of Households w/ Children Percentage of Households w/ Children Primary Service Area 9,682 50.3% Secondary Service Area 30,760 39.4% The information contained in Table-C helps further emphasize the lower median age in the service areas. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 5 Map A – Median Age by Census Tract MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 6 Table D – Median Household Income: 2015 Projection 2020 Projection Primary Service Area $51,330 $57,358 Secondary Service Area $58,242 $68,749 State of Washington $59,229 $69,388 Nationally $53,217 $60,683 Chart B – Median Household Income: $0 $10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000 $60,000 $70,000 2015 2020 Me d i a n H H I n c o m e Primary Service Area Secondary Service Area State of Washington National MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 7 Based upon 2015 projections for median household income the following narrative is available: In the Primary Service Area, the percentage of households with median income over $50,000 per year is 51.7% compared to 53.2% on a national level. Furthermore, the percentage of the households in the service area with median income less than $25,000 per year is 22.4% compared to a level of 23.1% nationally. In the Secondary Service Area, the percentage of households with median income over $50,000 per year is 57.5% compared to 53.2% on a national level. Furthermore, the percentage of the households in the service area with a median income less than $25,000 per year is 19.2% compared to a level of 23.1% nationally. The median income in the State of Washington is greater than the National number. The income level in both the Primary Service Area and the Secondary Service Area are both less than the State number with the Secondary Service Area greater than the national number and the Primary Service Area. The income level must be balanced with the overall cost of living to determine ability to pay for entertainment and recreation services. Chart C – Median Household Income Distribution 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% 100.0% 120.0% Primary Service Area Secondary Service Area State of Washington National 22.4%19.2%19.4%23.1% 25.8%23.3%22.1%23.8% 51.7%57.5%58.6%53.2% Me d i a n H H I n c o m e >$25,000 $25,000-$49,999 $50,000+ MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 8 Map B – Median Household Income by Census Tract MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 9 Household Budget Expenditures: In addition to studying Median Age and Median Income, it is important to examine Household Budget Expenditures. In particular, looking at housing information; shelter, utilities, fuel and public services along with entertainment & recreation can provide a snapshot into the cost of living and spending patterns in the services areas. The table below looks at that information and compares the service areas. Table E – Household Budget Expenditures3: Primary Service Area SPI Average Amount Spent Percent Housing 90 $19,370.26 30.3% Shelter 91 $15,003.50 23.5% Utilities, Fuel, Public Service 86 $4,366.76 6.8% Entertainment & Recreation 88 $2,912.33 4.6% Secondary Service Area SPI Average Amount Spent Percent Housing 104 $22,312.50 30.2% Shelter 105 $17,198.06 23.3% Utilities, Fuel, Public Service 101 $5,114.44 6.9% Entertainment & Recreation 102 $3,376.01 4.6% State of Washington SPI Average Amount Spent Percent Housing 107 $23,101.47 30.1% Shelter 108 $17,799.79 23.2% Utilities, Fuel, Public Service 105 $5,301.68 6.9% Entertainment & Recreation 106 $3,518.57 4.6% SPI: Spending Potential Index as compared to the National number of 100. Average Amount Spent: The average amount spent per household. Percent: Percent of the total 100% of household expenditures. Note: Shelter along with Utilities, Fuel, Public Service are a portion of the Housing percentage. 3 Consumer Spending data are derived from the 2004 and 2005 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics. ESRI forecasts for 2015 and 2020. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 10 Chart D – Household Budget Expenditures Spending Potential Index: Chart D, illustrates the Household Budget Expenditures Spending Potential Index in the service areas. The SPI follows a consistent pattern with median household income. Further Narrative on Housing: The total number of housing units in the Primary Service Area, according to the 2010 Census, is 20,103 and 95.8% of those are occupied, or 19,260 housing units. Of the available units the bulk are for rent, 1.6%. The total number of housing units in the Secondary Service Area, according to the 2010 Census, is 81,751 and 95.4% of those are occupied, or 77,981 housing units. Of the available units the bulk are for rent, 1.6%. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Housing Shelter Utilities, Fuel, Public Service Entertainment & Recreation SP I N u m b e r Primary Service Area Secondary Service Area State of Washington National MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 11 Recreation Expenditures Spending Potential Index: Finally, through the demographic provider that B*K utilizes for the market analysis portion of the report, we are able to examine the overall propensity for households to spend dollars on recreation activities. The following comparisons are possible. Table F – Recreation Expenditures Spending Potential Index4: Primary Service Area SPI Average Spent Fees for Participant Sports 96 $115.91 Fees for Recreational Lessons 90 $110.16 Social, Recreation, Club Membership 87 $150.02 Exercise Equipment/Game Tables 98 $74.88 Other Sports Equipment 84 $6.71 Secondary Service Area SPI Average Spent Fees for Participant Sports 108 $130.23 Fees for Recreational Lessons 106 $130.45 Social, Recreation, Club Membership 105 $180.67 Exercise Equipment/Game Tables 103 $79.42 Other Sports Equipment 96 $7.67 State of Washington SPI Average Spent Fees for Participant Sports 109 $131.29 Fees for Recreational Lessons 108 $132.74 Social, Recreation, Club Membership 108 $185.60 Exercise Equipment/Game Tables 106 $81.64 Other Sports Equipment 103 $8.24 Average Amount Spent: The average amount spent for the service or item in a year. SPI: Spending potential index as compared to the national number of 100. 4 Consumer Spending data are derived from the 2006 and 2007 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 12 Chart E – Recreation Spending Potential Index: The Spending Potential Index for Recreation is very similar to the Household Budgetary Spending. It is also important to note that these dollars are currently being spent for some recreation function. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Fees for Part Sports Fees for Rec Lessons Social, Recreaiton, Club Membership Exercise Equip/Game Tables Other Sports Equip Re c r e a t i o n S P I N u m b e r Primary Service Area Secondary Service Area State of Washington National MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 13 Map C – Entertainment & Recreation Spending Potential Index by Census Tract MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 14 Service Area Description: Primary Service Area – City of Pasco and Unincorporated Area. Map D – Primary Service Area Map: MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 15 Population Distribution by Age: Utilizing census information for the Primary Service Area, the following comparisons are possible. Table G – 2015 Primary Service Area Age Distribution (ESRI estimates) Ages Population % of Total Nat. Population Difference -5 7,738 10.8% 6.3% +2.5% 5-17 17,013 23.7% 16.6% +6.1% 18-24 7,215 10.1% 10.1% +0.0% 25-44 21,254 29.6% 26.1% +0.5% 45-54 6,913 9.6% 13.4% -5.8% 55-64 5,997 8.4% 12.8% -4.4% 65-74 3,572 5.0% 8.6% -3.6% 75+ 2,055 2.9% 6.2% -3.3% Population: 2015 census estimates in the different age groups in the Primary Service Area. % of Total: Percentage of the Primary Service Area/population in the age group. National Population: Percentage of the national population in the age group. Difference: Percentage difference between the Primary Service Area population and the national population. Chart F – 2015 Primary Service Area Age Group Distribution 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 5-17 yrs 18-24 25-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Pe r c e n t a g e o f P o p u l a t i o n Primary Service Area National MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 16 The demographic makeup of the Primary Service Area, when compared to the characteristics of the national population, indicates that there are some substantial differences with an equal or larger population in the -5, 5-17, 18-24 and 25-44 age groups and a smaller population in the 45-54, 55- 64, 65-74 and 75+ age groups. The largest positive variance is in the 5-17 age group with +6.1%, while the greatest negative variance is in the 45-54 age group with -5.8%. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 17 Population Distribution Comparison by Age: Utilizing census information from the Primary Service Area, the following comparisons are possible. Table H – 2015 Primary Service Area Population Estimates (U.S. Census Information and ESRI) Ages 2010 Census 2015 Projection 2020 Projection Percent Change Percent Change Nat’l -5 7,058 7,738 8,589 +21.7% +0.3% 5-17 15,128 17,013 19,322 +27.7% -0.7% 18-24 6,620 7,215 7,476 +12.9% +1.7% 25-44 18,665 21,254 23,946 +28.3% +7.1% 45-54 6,483 6,913 7,612 +17.4% -9.7% 55-64 5,024 5,997 6,095 +21.3% +17.4% 65-74 2,595 3,572 4,438 +71.0% +50.1% 75+ 1,947 2,055 2,430 +24.8% +22.0% Chart G – Primary Service Area Population Growth Table H, illustrates the growth or decline in age group numbers from the 2010 census until the year 2020. It is projected that all age group will see an increase. It must be remembered that the population of the United States as a whole is aging and it is not unusual to find negative growth numbers in the younger age groups and significant net gains in the 45 plus age groupings in communities which are relatively stable in their population numbers. 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 -5 5-17 yr 18-24 25-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Po p u l a t i o n 2010 2015 2020 MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 18 Ethnicity and Race: Below is listed the distribution of the population by ethnicity and race for the Primary Service Area for 2015 population projections. These numbers were developed from 2010 Census Data. Table I – Primary Service Area Ethnic Population and Median Age 2015 (Source – U.S. Census Bureau and ESRI) Ethnicity Total Population Median Age % of Population % of WA Population Hispanic 38,690 22.2 53.9% 12.5% Table J – Primary Service Area Population by Race and Median Age 2015 (Source – U.S. Census Bureau and ESRI) Race Total Population Median Age % of Population % of WA Population White 40,122 32.7 55.9% 75.0% Black 1,674 34.3 2.3% 3.9% American Indian 446 34.0 0.6% 1.5% Asian 1,489 36.7 2.1% 8.0% Pacific Islander 124 34.5 0.2% 0.7% Other 25,327 22.7 35.3% 5.7% Multiple 2,577 15.0 3.6% 5.1% 2015 Primary Service Area Total Population: 71,759 Residents Chart H – 2015 Primary Service Area Non-White Population by Race 2.3% 0.6%2.1% 0.2% 35.3% 3.6% Black American Indian Asian Pacific Islander Other Multiple MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 19 Service Area Description: Secondary Service Area – A unique shape that includes Pasco, Kennewick and Richland as well as West Richland, Finley and Burbank. Map E – Secondary Service Area Map: MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 20 Population Distribution by Age: Utilizing census information for the Secondary Service Area, the following comparisons are possible. Table K – 2015 Secondary Service Area Age Distribution (ESRI estimates) Ages Population % of Total Nat. Population Difference -5 19,589 8.1% 6.3% +1.8% 5-17 47,965 19.9% 16.6% +3.3% 18-24 23,064 9.6% 10.1% -0.5% 25-44 64,284 26.7% 26.1% +0.6% 45-54 28,545 11.9% 13.4% -1.5% 55-64 27,932 11.6% 12.8% -1.2% 65-74 17,655 7.3% 8.6% -1.3% 75+ 11,446 4.8% 6.2% -1.4% Population: 2015 census estimates in the different age groups in the Secondary Service Area. % of Total: Percentage of the Secondary Service Area/population in the age group. National Population: Percentage of the national population in the age group. Difference: Percentage difference between the Secondary Service Area population and the national population. Chart I – 2015 Secondary Service Area Age Group Distribution 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 5-17 yrs 18-24 25-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Pe r c e n t a g e o f P o p u l a t i o n Secondary Service Area National MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 21 The demographic makeup of the Secondary Service Area, when compared to the characteristics of the national population, indicates that there are some differences with an equal or larger population in the -5, 5-17 and 25-44 age groups and a smaller population in the 18-24, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74 and 75+ age groups. The largest positive variance is in the 5-17 age group with +3.3%, while the greatest negative variance is in the 45-54 age group with -1.5%. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 22 Population Distribution Comparison by Age: Utilizing census information from the Secondary Service Area, the following comparisons are possible. Table L – 2015 Secondary Service Area Population Estimates (U.S. Census Information and ESRI) Ages 2010 Census 2015 Projection 2020 Projection Percent Change Percent Change Nat’l -5 18,601 19,589 21,198 +14.0% +0.3% 5-17 45,374 47,965 51,474 +34.4% -0.7% 18-24 20,709 23,064 22,818 +10.2% +1.7% 25-44 58,547 64,284 72,040 +23.0% +7.1% 45-54 28,772 28,545 28,461 -1.1% -9.7% 55-64 24,082 27,932 28,997 +20.4% +17.4% 65-74 12,943 17,655 22,271 +72.1% +50.1% 75+ 10,248 11,446 14,060 +37.2% +22.0% Chart J – Secondary Service Area Population Growth Table-L illustrates the growth or decline in age group numbers from the 2010 census until the year 2020. It is projected that all age categories will see an increase except the 45-54 age group. It must be remembered that the population of the United States as a whole is aging and it is not unusual to find negative growth numbers in the younger age groups and significant net gains in the 45 plus age groupings in communities which are relatively stable in their population numbers. 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 -5 5-17 yr 18-24 25-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Po p u l a t i o n 2010 2015 2020 MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 23 Ethnicity and Race: Below is listed the distribution of the population by ethnicity and race for the Secondary Service Area for 2015 population projections. Those numbers were developed from 2010 Census Data. Table M – Secondary Service Area Ethnic Population and Median Age 2015 (Source – U.S. Census Bureau and ESRI) Ethnicity Total Population Median Age % of Population % of WA Population Hispanic 70,505 22.3 29.3% 12.5% Table N – Secondary Service Area Population by Race and Median Age 2015 (Source – U.S. Census Bureau and ESRI) Race Total Population Median Age % of Population % of WA Population White 176,621 38.0 73.4% 75.0% Black 4,480 31.3 1.9% 3.9% American Indian 2,080 34.0 0.9% 1.5% Asian 6,717 38.4 2.8% 8.0% Pacific Islander 404 29.5 0.2% 0.7% Other 40,462 22.9 16.8% 5.7% Multiple 9,718 17.2 4.0% 5.1% 2015 Secondary Service Area Total Population: 240,482 Residents Chart K – 2015 Secondary Service Area Non-White Population by Race 1.9% 0.9% 2.8% 0.2% 16.8% 4.0% Black American Indian Asian Pacific Islander Other Multiple MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 24 Tapestry Segmentation Tapestry segmentation represents the 4th generation of market segmentation systems that began 30 years ago. The 65-segment Tapestry Segmentation system classifies U.S. neighborhoods based on their socioeconomic and demographic compositions. While the demographic landscape of the U.S. has changed significantly since the 2000 Census, the tapestry segmentation has remained stable as neighborhoods have evolved. The value of including this information for the Service Areas is that it allows the organization to understand better the consumers/constituents in their service areas and supply them with the right products and services. The Tapestry segmentation system classifies U.S. neighborhoods into 65 individual market segments. More than 60 attributes including; income, employment, home value, housing types, education, household composition, age and other key determinates of consumer behavior are used to identify neighborhoods. The following pages and tables outline the top 5 tapestry segments in each of the service areas and provides a brief description of each. This information combined with the key indicators and demographic analysis of each service area help further describe the markets that the Primary Service Area looks to serve with programs, services, and special events. For comparison purposes, the following are the top 10 Tapestry segments, along with percentage in the United States. The Primary and Secondary Services may or may not reflect these segments: 1. Green Acres (6A) 3.2% 2. Southern Satellites (10A) 3.2% 3. Savvy Suburbanites (1D) 3.0% 4. Salt of the Earth (6B) 2.9% 5. Soccer Moms (4A) 2.8% 15.1% 6. Middleburg (4C) 2.8% 7. Midlife Constants (5E) 2.5% 8. Comfortable Empty Nesters (5A) 2.5% 9. Heartland Communities (6F) 2.4% 10. Old and Newcomers (8F) 2.3% 12.5% MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 25 Table O – Primary Service Area Tapestry Segment Comparison (ESRI estimates) Primary Service Area Demographics Percent Cumulative Percent Median Age Median HH Income Up & Coming Families (7A) 30.2% 30.2% 30.7 $64,000 Valley Growers (7E) 26.0% 56.2% 26.6 $32,000 Barriors Urbanos (7D) 9.4% 65.6% 28.3 $36,000 Comfortable Empty Nesters (5A) 5.9% 71.5% 46.8 $68,000 Green Acres (6A) 5.2% 76.7% 43.0 $72,000 Up & Coming Families (7A) – This is a market in transition, residents are younger, are more mobile and ethnically diverse than the previous generation. Their homes a re new; their families are young. There is a significant Hispanic (26.7%) and Black (14.8%) population in this segment. This segment finds leisure in family activities which includes sports from backpacking and baseball to weight lifting and yoga. Valley Growers (7E) – These neighborhoods are home to young, Hispanic families with children and frequently multiple generations living in single-family homes. This market is all about spending time with family, taking care of family and home, and following the Hispanic heritage. More homes are rented than owned, located in semirural areas where agriculture dominates. Barriors Urbanos (7D) – Family is central within these diverse communities. Hispanics make up more than 70% of the residents. Dominating this market are younger families with children or single - parent households with multiple generations living under the same roof. These households balance their budgets carefully but also indulge in the latest trends and purchase with an eye to brands. Comfortable Empty Nesters (5A) – Residents in this large, growing segment are older, with more than half of all households aged 55 or older; many still live in the suburbs where they grew up. Most are professionals working in government, health care, or manufacturing. Many are enjoying the transition from child rearing to retirement. Physically active, they play golf, ski, ride bicycles and work out regularly. Green Acres (6A) – This segment features country living and self-reliance. Outdoor living features a variety of sports; hunting and fishing, motorcycling, hiking and camping and even golf. An older market, primarily couples, most with no children. This is not an ethnicall y diverse segment. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 26 Table P – Secondary Service Area Tapestry Segment Comparison (ESRI estimates) Secondary Service Area Demographics Percent Cumulative Percent Median Age Median HH Income Up & Coming Families (7A) 7.7% 7.7% 30.7 $64,000 Valley Growers (7E) 7.5% 15.2% 26.6 $32,000 In Style (5B) 6.9% 22.1% 41.1 $66,000 Savvy Suburbanites (1D) 6.8% 28.9% 44.1 $104,000 Middleburg (4C) 6.3% 35.2% 35.3 $55,000 Up & Coming Families (7A) – This is a market in transition, residents are younger, are more mobile and ethnically diverse than the previous generation. Their homes a re new; their families are young. There is a significant Hispanic (26.7%) and Black (14.8%) population in this segment. This segment finds leisure in family activities which includes sports from backpacking and baseball to weight lifting and yoga. Valley Growers (7E) – These neighborhoods are home to young, Hispanic families with children and frequently multiple generations living in single-family homes. This market is all about spending time with family, taking care of family and home, and following the Hispanic heritage. More homes are rented than owned, located in semirural areas where agriculture dominates. In Style (5B) – These residents embrace an urban lifestyle that includes support of the arts, travel and extensive reading. Professional couples or single households without children, they have the time to focus on their homes and their interest. The population is slightly older and already planning for their retirement. This segment is not ethnically diverse. Savvy Suburbanites (1D) – These residents are well educated, well read, and well capitalized. Families include empty nesters and empty nester wannabes, who still have adult children at home. Located in older neighborhoods outside the urban core, their suburban lifestyle includes home remodeling and gardening, plus the active pursuits of sports and exercise. This segment is not ethnically diverse. Middleburg (4C) – These neighborhoods transformed from the easy pace of country living to semirural subdivisions in the last decade. Residents are conservative, family-oriented consumers. They rely on their smartphones and mobile devices to stay in touch and pride themselves on their expertise. Neighborhoods are comprised of young couples, many with children. There is a significant Hispanic (10.5%) population. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 27 Chart L – Primary Service Area Tapestry Segment Representation by Percentage: 30.2% 26.0% 9.4% 5.9% 5.2%23.3% Up & Coming Families Valley Growers Barriors Urbanos Comfortable Empty Nesters Green Acres Other MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 28 Demographic Summary The following summarizes the demographic characteristics of the service areas.  The Primary Service Area has a large household size and the median age is considerably younger than the national number and lower than the state. There will be strong growth in the population in the coming years.  The Primary Service Area has a median household income level that is lower than the state and as a result has a lower Recreation Spending Potential Index.  The Primary Service Area has large number of households with children and there is expected to be significant growth in the youth age groups in the coming years.  There is a large Hispanic population in the Primary Service Area.  The Secondary Service Area is much larger in population but has fewer households with children, higher incomes, a higher Recreation Spending Potential Index, and a smaller Hispanic population than the Primary Service Area. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 29 Sports Participation Numbers: In addition to analyzing the demographic realities of the service areas, it is possible to project possible participation in recreation and sport activities. Participation Numbers: On an annual basis the National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA) conducts an in-depth study and survey of how Americans spend their leisure time. This information provides the data necessary to overlay rate of participation onto the Primary Service Area to determine market potential. B*K takes the national average and combines that with participation percentages of the Primary Service Area based upon age distribution, median income, region and National number. Those four percentages are then averaged together to create a unique participation percentage for the service area. This participation percentage when applied to the population of the Primary Service Area then provides an idea of the market potential for various activities. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 30 Community Recreation Related Activities Participation: These activities are typical components of an active recreation center. Table Q – Recreation Activity Participation Rates for the Primary Service Area Indoor Activities Age Income Region Nation Average Aerobics 15.3% 15.3% 16.0% 15.3% 15.5% Basketball 10.2% 8.3% 7.3% 8.2% 8.5% Cheerleading 1.7% 1.4% 1.3% 1.3% 1.4% Exercise Walking 27.8% 36.8% 37.4% 36.2% 34.6% Exercise w/ Equipment 18.2% 19.8% 17.5% 19.1% 18.7% Gymnastics 2.5% 2.2% 2.0% 1.9% 2.2% Martial Arts / MMA 2.7% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% Running/Jogging 16.8% 14.5% 14.7% 14.9% 15.2% Swimming 17.6% 16.3% 16.4% 15.9% 16.6% Volleyball 4.2% 3.7% 3.9% 3.5% 3.8% Weight Lifting 12.1% 11.6% 11.9% 11.8% 11.8% Workout @ Clubs 12.4% 12.0% 12.4% 12.5% 12.3% Wrestling 1.2% 1.0% 1.5% 1.0% 1.2% Yoga 10.5% 9.5% 12.2% 10.1% 10.6% Age Income Region Nation Average Did Not Participate 22.3% 21.9% 22.1% 22.6% 22.2% Age: Participation based on individuals ages 7 & Up of the Primary Service Area. Income: Participation based on the 2013 estimated median household income in the Primary Service Area. Region: Participation based on regional statistics (Pacific). National: Participation based on national statistics. Average: Average of the four columns. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 31 Chart M – Comparison of National & Primary Service Area Participation Percentage: 10.6% 1.2% 12.3% 11.8% 3.8% 16.6% 15.2% 2.3% 2.2% 18.7% 34.6% 1.4% 8.5% 15.5% 0.0%5.0%10.0%15.0%20.0%25.0%30.0%35.0%40.0% Yoga Wrestling Workout @ Club Weight Lifting Volleyball Swimming Running/Jogging Martial Arts/MMA Gymnastics Exercise w/ Equipment Exercise Walking Cheerleading Basketball Aerobics Primary Service National MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 32 Anticipated Participation Numbers by Activity: Utilizing the average percentage from Table- Q above plus the 2010 census information and census estimates for 2015 and 2020 (over age 7) the following comparisons are available. Table R – Participation Rates Primary Service Area Indoor Activity Average 2010 Part. 2015 Part. 2020 Part. Difference Aerobics 15.5% 8,319 9,444 10,525 2,206 Basketball 8.5% 4,567 5,185 5,778 1,211 Cheerleading 1.4% 763 866 965 202 Exercise Walking 34.6% 18,585 21,097 23,512 4,927 Exercise w/ Equipment 18.7% 10,033 11,389 12,693 2,660 Gymnastics 2.2% 1,161 1,318 1,469 308 Martial Arts / MMA 2.3% 1,256 1,425 1,589 333 Running/Jogging 15.2% 8,189 9,296 10,360 2,171 Swimming 16.6% 8,902 10,105 11,262 2,360 Volleyball 3.8% 2,058 2,336 2,604 546 Weight Lifting 11.8% 6,369 7,230 8,057 1,688 Workout @ Clubs 12.3% 6,622 7,517 8,377 1,756 Wrestling 1.2% 634 720 803 168 Yoga 10.6% 5,689 6,458 7,198 1,508 Average 2010 Part. 2015 Part. 2020 Part. Difference Did Not Participate 22.2% 11,953 13,568 15,122 3,169 Note: The estimated participation numbers indicated above are for activities that could take place in and around an active aquatic/recreation center. These figures do not necessarily translate into attendance figures for various activities or programs. The “Did Not Participate” statistics refers to all 55 activities outlined in the NSGA 2014 Survey Instrument. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 33 Swimming Participation: In addition to developing a unique participation percentage for the Primary Service Area, B*K also examines the frequency of participation in swimming according to the 2014 NSGA Survey. The chart below outlines that data. Table S – Participation Frequency Swimming Frequent Occasional Infrequent Swimming Frequency 110+ 25-109 6-24 Swimming Percentage of Population 6.4% 45.0% 48.6% In the chart above, one can look at swimming and how it is defined with respect to visits being Frequent, Occasional or Infrequent and then the percentage of population that participates. Table T – Participation Numbers Frequent Occasional Infrequent Total Swimming 112 67 15 Population 647 4,547 4,911 Visits 72,432 304,662 73,665 450,759 The table above takes the frequency information one step further and identifies the number of times an individual may participate in the activity, applies the percentage from Table-Q to the 2015 swimming population in Table-R and then gives a total number of aquatic facility visits. Those visits are not specific to one facility, but rather specific to the Primary Service Area population. Frequent Users: Competitive swimmers, multi-sport athletes and individuals that participate in lap swimming for exercise fall into this group. Their preference is 50M or 25Y lap lanes, and they have little concern for the social aspects of aquatics. Occasional Users: Some multi-sport athletes, some lap swimmers and individuals using the pool for other fitness purposes such as water walking or group exercise fall into this group. Also included in this group are some families. Their preference is the inclusion of lap lanes, but also shallow and deep water and varied water temperatures. Infrequent Users: Families and non-lap swimmers fall into this group. Their preference has little to do with exercise in the water. They are looking for shallow water, interactive play features and warm water. Being in the water is merely enough for this group, and the social aspect is significantly more important than exercise or competition. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 34 Swimming Cross-Participation: As part of the annual survey conducted by the NSGA, cross participation analysis is conducted. The chart below indicates the other activities that swimmers participated in, compares that rate of participation to the national number and also provides an index. Table U – Swimming Cross-Participation Activity % Swimmer Part. Total US Part. Index Exercise Walking 45.5% 36.2% 126 Running/Jogging 28.7% 14.9% 192 Exercising w/ Equip. 28.1% 19.1% 147 Bicycle Riding 27.7% 12.3% 224 Aerobic Exercising 22.9% 15.3% 149 Weightlifting 19.1% 11.8% 162 Basketball 18.8% 8.2% 229 Work Out @ Club 18.7% 12.5% 150 Yoga 17.6% 10.1% 174 Tennis 11.8% 4.3% 275 Soccer 11.7% 4.7% 251 Volleyball 11.0% 3.5% 311 Baseball 9.9% 3.9% 251 Ice/Figure Skating 7.5% 2.5% 296 Softball 6.7% 3.3% 202 Gymnastics 4.8% 1.9% 253 Martial Arts/MMA 3.8% 2.2% 175 Wrestling 2.6% 1.0% 266 Lacrosse 1.7% 1.0% 179 Hockey (ice) 1.4% 1.2% 117 Activity: Various activities that could take place around a pool or recreation facility. % of Swimmer Part.: Percent of swimmers that participate in the corresponding activity. Total US Part.: Total percent of US population that participates in an activity. Index: National index is 100. Based upon the 20 activities listed above the rate of swimmer participation in those activities is greater than the national participation rate in all activities. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 35 Participation by Ethnicity and Race: The table below compares the overall rate of participation nationally with the rate for Hispanics and African Americans. Utilizing information provided by the National Sporting Goods Association's 2014 survey, the following comparisons are possible. Table V – Comparison of National, African American and Hispanic Participation Rates Indoor Activity Primary Service Area National Participation African American Participation Hispanic Participation Aerobics 15.5% 15.3% 12.0% 15.4% Basketball 8.5% 8.2% 11.9% 7.2% Cheerleading 1.4% 1.3% 1.4% 1.2% Exercise Walking 34.6% 36.2% 23.6% 30.3% Exercise w/ Equipment 18.7% 19.1% 12.2% 16.1% Gymnastics 2.2% 1.9% 3.4% 2.4% Martial Arts / MMA 2.3% 2.2% 1.7% 2.2% Running/Jogging 15.2% 14.9% 10.3% 16.9% Swimming 16.6% 15.9% 5.9% 12.0% Volleyball 3.8% 3.5% 3.3% 3.4% Weight Lifting 11.8% 11.8% 8.2% 12.3% Workout @ Clubs 12.3% 12.5% 9.0% 12.0% Wrestling 1.2% 1.0% 1.0% 1.9% Yoga 10.6% 10.1% 6.5% 10.3% Primary Service Part: The unique participation percentage developed for the Primary Service Area. National Rate: The national percentage of individuals who participate in the given activity. African American Rate: The percentage of African-Americans who participate in the given activity. Hispanic Rate: The percentage of Hispanics who participate in the given activity. There is a significant Hispanic population in the Primary Service Area. As such these numbers play more of a factor with regards to overall participation. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 36 Summary of Sports Participation: The following chart summarizes participation in both indoor and outdoor activities utilizing information from the 2014 National Sporting Goods Association survey. Table W – Sports Participation Summary Sport Nat’l Rank5 Nat’l Participation (in millions) Primary Service Primary Service Area Percentage Exercise Walking 1 104.3 1 34.6% Exercising w/ Equipment 2 55.1 2 18.7% Swimming 3 45.9 3 16.6% Aerobic Exercising 4 44.2 4 15.5% Running/Jogging 5 43.0 5 15.2% Workout @ Club 8 35.9 6 12.3% Weight Lifting 11 34.0 7 11.8% Yoga 13 29.2 8 10.6% Basketball 14 23.7 9 8.5% Volleyball 24 10.2 10 3.8% Martial Arts / MMA 36 6.3 11 2.3% Gymnastics 39 5.4 12 2.2% Cheerleading 46 3.6 13 1.4% Wrestling 50 2.9 14 1.2% Nat’l Rank: Popularity of sport based on national survey. Nat’l Participation: Population that participates in this sport based on the national survey. Primary Service Rank: The rank of the activity within the Primary Service Area. Primary Service %: Percentage of the population that participates in activities based upon average from Table-Q. 5 This rank is based upon the 54 activities reported on by NSGA in their 2014 survey instrument. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 37 Chart N – Sports Participation in Primary Service Area 1.2% 1.4% 2.2% 2.3% 3.8% 8.5% 10.6% 11.8% 12.3% 15.2% 15.5% 16.6% 18.7% 34.6% 0.0%5.0%10.0%15.0%20.0%25.0%30.0%35.0%40.0% Wrestling Cheerleading Gymnastics Martial Arts / MMA Volleyball Basketball Yoga Weight Lifting Workout @ Club Running/Jogging Aerobic Exercising Swimming Exercising w/ Equipment Exercise Walking Primary Service Area MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 38 Market Potential Index for Adult Participation: In addition to examining the participation numbers for various indoor activities through the NSGA 2014 Survey and the Spending Potential Index for Entertainment & Recreation, B*K can access information about Sports & Leisure Market Potential. The following information illustrates participation rates for adults in various activities in the Primary Service Area. Table X – Market Potential Index for Adult Participation in Activities Adults participated in: Expected Number of Adults Percent of Population MPI Aerobics 4,237 9.0% 101 Basketball 3,837 8.2% 98 Bicycling (road) 4,001 8.5% 87 Jogging/Running 6,406 13.6% 107 Pilates 1,320 2.8% 101 Swimming 7,622 16.2% 102 Volleyball 1,701 3.6% 102 Walking for Exercise 11,220 23.9% 85 Weight Lifting 5,040 10.7% 101 Yoga 3,151 6.7% 94 Expected # of Adults: Number of adults, 18 years of age and older, participating in the activity in the Primary Service Area. Percent of Population: Percent of the service area that participates in the activity. MPI: Market potential index as compared to the national number of 100. This table indicates that the overall propensity for adults to participate in the various activities listed is greater than the national number of 100 in 6 of 10 instances. In many cases when a participation number is lower than the National number, primary factors include a lack of facilities or an inability to pay for services and programs. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 39 Map F – Market Potential Index for Adult Participation in Swimming by Census Tract MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 40 Sports Participation Trends: Below are listed a number of sports activities and the percentage of growth or decline that each has experienced nationally over the last ten years (2005-2014). Table Y – National Activity Trend (in millions) Increasing in Popularity 2005 Participation 2014 Participation Percent Change Lacrosse6 1.2 2.8 133.3% Kayaking7 5.9 9.0 52.5% Running/Jogging 29.2 43.0 47.3% Hockey (ice) 2.4 3.4 41.7% Yoga8 20.7 29.2 41.1% Gymnastics9 3.9 5.4 38.5% Hiking 29.8 41.1 37.9% Aerobic Exercising 33.7 44.2 31.2% Exercise Walking 86.0 104.3 21.3% Tennis 11.1 12.4 11.7% Cheerleading 3.3 3.6 9.1% Workout @ Club 34.7 35.9 3.5% Canoeing10 7.1 7.3 2.8% Exercising w/ Equipment 54.2 55.1 1.7% Ice/Figure Skating11 6.7 7.3 1.4% 6 Growth since 2007. 7 Growth since 2007. 8 Growth since 2007. 9 Growth since 2009. 10 Growth since 2006. 11 Growth since 2013. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 41 Decreasing in Popularity 2005 Participation 2014 Participation Percent Change Martial Arts / MMA12 6.4 6.3 -1.6% Weight Lifting 35.5 34.0 -4.2% Soccer 14.1 13.4 -5.0% Boxing13 3.8 3.4 -10.5% Camping 46.0 39.5 -14.1% Bicycle Riding 43.1 35.6 -17.4% Basketball 29.9 23.7 -20.7% Swimming 58.0 45.9 -20.9% Fishing (fresh water) 37.5 29.4 -21.6% Baseball 14.6 11.3 -22.6% Volleyball 13.2 10.2 -22.7% Wrestling 0.0 2.9 -23.7% Football (tackle) 9.9 7.5 -24.2% Golf 24.7 18.4 -25.5% Softball 14.1 9.5 -32.6% Boating 27.5 14.1 -48.7% Skateboarding 12.0 5.4 -55.0% 2014 Participation: The number of participants per year in the activity (in millions) in the United States. 2005 Participation: The number of participants per year in the activity (in millions) in the United States. Percent Change: The percent change in the level of participation from 2005 to 2014. It is significant that swimming has declined in overall popularity in the United States by nearly 21% in the last ten years. However, there were still nearly 46 million people that participated in swimming in 2014. 12 Growth since 2013. 13 Growth since 2013. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 42 Chart O – Participation in Swimming: While the national participation in swimming has been trending downward, USA Swimming has reported record registration numbers in the past 10 years. Additionally, swimming participation tends to see an increase in Olympic years. Although swimming has decreased the total number of participation is still in the top three of the National Sport Goods Association and is one of the few activities that individuals can participate in from birth to death. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1990 1995 2000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 67.5 61.5 58.8 58.0 46.5 52.3 53.5 50.2 51.9 46.0 48.6 45.5 45.9 Ag e Participation in Millions Nationally MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 43 Sports & Fitness Industry Association: Another source of sports participation statistics is through the SFIA. The following table indicates the rate of participation in different sports activities by age generation. Chart P – SFIA Sports Activity Participation by Generation Aquatic Activity Trends: The following table looks at the participation trends in these specific aquatic activities over the last 5 years Table Z – SFIA Aquatic Activity Trends (in millions) 2009 Participation 2014 Participation Percent Change Triathlon 1.1 2.2 +91.9% Swim for Fitness 21.5 25.3 +17.6% Swimming on a Team 2.4 2.7 +14.7% Aquatic Exercise 9.0 9.1 +1.8% Note: Swim for Fitness and Swimming on a Team statistics are from 2011 to 2014. It is significant that each of the aquatic activities has seen an increase over the last five years. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Individual Sports Racquet Sports Team Sports Outdoor Sports Water Sports Fitness Sports Pe r c e n t a g e o f A g e G r o u p Boomers (1945-1964)Gen X (1965-1979)Millennials (1980-1999)Gen Z (2000+) MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 44 Non-Sport Participation Statistics: It is important to note participation rates in non-sport activities as well. While there is not an abundance of information available for participation in these types of activities as compared to sport activities, there are statistics that can be utilized to help determine the market for cultural arts activities and events. There are many ways to measure a nation’s cultural vitality. One way is to chart the public’s involvement with arts events and other activities over time. The NEA’s Survey of Publi c Participation in the Arts remains the largest periodic study of arts participation in the United States, and it is conducted in partnership with the U.S. Census Bureau. The large number of survey respondents – similar in make-up to the total U.S. adult population – permits a statistical snapshot of American’s engagement with the arts by frequency and activity type. The survey has taken place five times since 1982, allowing researchers to compare the trends not only for the total adult population but also for demographic subgroups.14 The participation numbers for these activities are national numbers. 14 National Endowment for the Arts, Arts Participation 2008 Highlights from a National Survey. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 45 Table AA – Percentage of U.S. Adult Population Attending Arts Performances: 1982 -2008 Rate of Change 1982 1992 2002 2008 2002-2008 1982-2008 Jazz 9.6% 10.6% 10.8% 7.8% -28% -19% Classical Music 13.0% 12.5% 11.6% 9.3% -20% -29% Opera 3.0% 3.3% 3.2% 2.1% -34% -30% Musical Plays 18.6% 17.4% 17.1% 16.7% -2% -10% Non-Musical Plays 11.9% 13.5% 12.3% 9.4% -24% -21% Ballet 4.2% 4.7% 3.9% 2.9% -26% -31% Smaller percentages of adults attended performing arts events than in previous years.  Opera and jazz participation significantly decreased for the first time, with attendance rates falling below what they were in 1982.  Classical music attendance continued to decline – at a 29% rate since 1982 – with the steepest drop occurring from 2002 to 2008  Only musical play saw no statistically significant change in attendance since 2002. Chart Q – Percentage of U.S. Adult Population Attending Arts Performances: 0.0% 2.0% 4.0% 6.0% 8.0% 10.0% 12.0% 14.0% 16.0% 18.0% 20.0% Jazz Classical Music Opera Musical Plays Non-Musical Plays Ballet Ag e 1982 1992 2002 2008 MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 46 Table AB – Percentage of U.S. Adult Population Attending Art Museums, Parks, and Festivals: 1982-2008 Rate of Change 1982 1992 2002 2008 2002-2008 1982-2008 Art Museums/Galleries 22.1% 26.7% 26.5% 22.7% -14% +3% Parks/Historical Buildings 37.0% 34.5% 31.6% 24.9% -21% -33% Craft/Visual Arts Festivals 39.0% 40.7% 33.4% 24.5% -27% -37% Attendance for the most popular types of arts events – such as museums and craft fairs – also declined.  After topping 26% in 1992 and 2002, the art museum attendance rate slipped to 23 percent in 2008 – comparable to the 1982 level.  The proportion of the U.S. adults touring parks or historical buildings has diminished by one-third since 1982. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 47 Table AC – Median Age of Arts Attendees: 1982-2008 Rate of Change 1982 1992 2002 2008 2002-2008 1982-2008 U.S. Adults, Average 39 41 43 45 +2 +6 Jazz 29 37 43 46 +4 +17 Classical Music 40 44 47 49 +2 +9 Opera 43 44 47 48 +1 +5 Musicals 39 42 44 45 +1 +6 Non-Musical Plays 39 42 44 47 +3 +8 Ballet 37 40 44 46 +2 +9 Art Museums 36 39 44 43 -1 +7 Long-term trends suggest fundamental shifts in the relationship between age and arts attendance.  Performing arts attendees are increasingly older than the average U.S. adult.  Jazz concert-goers are no longer the youngest group of arts participants.  Since 1982, young adult (18-24-year-old) attendance rates have declined significantly for jazz, classical music, ballet, and non-musical plays.  From 2002 to 2008, however, 45-54-year-olds – historically a significant component of arts audiences – showed the steepest declines in attendance for most arts events. Chart R – Percentage of U.S. Adult Population Attending Arts Performances: 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Jazz Classical Music Opera Musical Plays Non-Musical Plays Ballet Art Museums Ag e 1982 1992 2002 2008 MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 48 Table AD – Percentage of U.S. Adult Population Performing or Creating Art: 1992-2008 Rate of Change 1992 2002 2008 2002-2008 1982-2008 Performing: Jazz 1.7% 1.3% 1.3% +0.0% -0.4% Classical Music 4.2% 1.8% 3.0% +1.2% -1.2% Opera 1.1% 0.7% 0.4% -0.3% -0.7% Choir/Chorus 6.3% 4.8% 5.2% +0.4% -1.1% Musical Plays 3.8% 2.4% 0.9% -1.5% -2.9% Non-Musical Plays 1.6% 1.4% 0.8% -0.6% -0.8% Dance 8.1% 4.3% 2.1% -2.2% -6.0% Making: Painting/Drawing 9.6% 8.6% 9.0% +0.4% -0.6% Pottery/Ceramics 8.4% 6.9% 6.0% -0.9% -2.4% Weaving/Sewing 24.8% 16.0% 13.1% -2.9% -11.7% Photography 11.6% 11.5% 14.7% +3.2% +3.1% Creative Writing 7.4% 7.0% 6.9% -0.1% -0.5% Adults are creating or performing at lower rates – despite opportunities for displaying their work line.  Only photography increased from 1992 to 2008 – reflecting, perhaps, greater access through digital media.  The proportion of U.S. adults doing creative writing has hovered around 7.0 percent.  The rate of classical music performance slipped from 1992 to 2002 then grew over the next six years.  The adult participation rate for weaving or sewing was almost twice as great in 1992 as in 2008. This activity remains one of the most popular forms of art creation. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 49 Table AE – Percentage of U.S. Adult Population Viewing or Listening to Art Broadcasts or Recordings, 2008 (online media included) Percentage Millions of Adults Jazz 14.2% 31.9 Classical Music 17.8% 40.0 Latin or Salsa Music 14.9% 33.5 Opera 4.9% 11.0 Musical Plays 7.9% 17.8 Non-Musical Plays 6.8% 15.3 Dance 8.0% 18.0 Programs about the visual arts 15.0% 33.7 Programs about books/writers 15.0% 33.7 As in previous years, more Americans view or listen to broadcasts and recordings of arts events than attend them live.  The sole exception is live theater, which still attracts more adults than broadcasts or recordings of plays or musicals (online media included).  Classical music broadcasts or recordings attract the greatest number of adult listeners, followed by Latin or salsa music.  33.7 million Americans listened to or watched programs or recordings about books. Chart S – Percentage of U.S. Adult Population Attending Arts Performances: 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 40.0 Jazz Classical Music Latin/Salsa Opera Musical Plays Non-Musical Plays Dance Viscual Arts Books/Writers 31.9 40.0 33.5 11.0 17.8 15.3 18.0 33.7 33.7 Ag e Millions of Adults MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 50 Aquatic Participation Trends: Swimming is one of the most popular sports and leisure activities, meaning that there is a significant market for aquatic pursuits. Approximately 16.4% of the population in the Pacific region of the country participates in aquatic activities. This is a significant segment of the population. Despite the recent emphasis on recreational swimming the more traditional aspects of aquatics (including swim teams, instruction and aqua fitness) remain as an important part of most aquatic centers. The life safety issues associated with teaching children how to swim is a critical concern in most communities and competitive swim team programs through USA Swimming, high schools, masters, and other community based organizations continue to be important. Aqua fitness, from aqua exercise to lap swimming, has enjoyed strong growth during the last ten years with the realization of the benefits of water-based exercise. A competitive pool allows for a variety of aquatic activities to take place simultaneously and can handle aqua exercise classes, learn to swim programs as well competitive swim training and meets (short course and possibly long course). In communities where there are a number of competitive swim programs, utilizing a pool with 8 lanes or more is usually important. A competitive pool that is designed for hosting meets will allow a community to build a more regional or even national identity as a site for competitive swimming. However, it should be realized that regional and national swim meets are difficult to obtain on a regular basis, take a considerable amount of time, effort and money to run; can be disruptive to the regular user groups and can be financial losers for the facility itself. On the other side such events can provide a strong economic stimulus to the overall community. Competitive diving is an activity that is often found in connection with competitive swimming. Most high school and regional diving competition centers on the 1-meter board with some 3 meter events (non-high school). The competitive diving market, unlike swimming, is usually very small (usually 10% to 20% the size of the competitive swim market) and has been decreasing steadily over the last ten years or more. As a result, many states have or are considering the elimination of diving as a part of high school swimming. Diving programs have been more viable in markets with larger populations and where there are coaches with strong diving reputations. Moving from springboard diving to platform (5 meter and 10 meter, and sometimes 3 and 7.5 meters), the market for divers drops even more while the cost of construction with deeper pool depths and higher dive towers becomes significantly larger. Platform diving is usually only a competitive event in regional and national diving competitions. As a result, the need for inclusion of diving platforms in a competitive aquatic facility needs to be carefully studied to determine the true economic feasibility of such an amenity. There are a couple of other aquatic sports that are often competing for pool time at competitive aquatic centers. However, their competition base and number of participants is relatively small. Water polo is a sport that continues to be reasonably popular on the west coast but is not nearly as strong in Washington and uses a space of 25 yards or meters by 45-66 feet wide (the basic size of MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 51 an 8 lane, 25-yard pool). However, a minimum depth of 6 foot 6 inches is required which is often difficult to find in more community based facilities. Synchronized swimming also utilizes aquatic facilities for their sport and they also require deeper water of 7-8 feet. This also makes the use of some community pools difficult. Without doubt the hottest trend in aquatics is the leisure pool concept. This idea of incorporating slides, lazy rivers (or current channels), fountains, zero depth entry and other water features into a pool’s design has proved to be extremely popular for the recreational user. The age of the conventional pool in most recreational settings has greatly diminished. Leisure pools appeal to the younger kids (who are the largest segment of the population that swims) and to families. These types of facilities are able to attract and draw larger crowds and people tend to come from a further distance and stay longer to utilize such pools. This all translates into the potential to sell more admissions and increase revenues. It is estimated conservatively that a leisure pool can generate up to 30% more revenue than a comparable conventional pool and the cost of operation while being higher, has been offset through increased revenues. Of note is the fact that patrons seem willing to pay a higher user fee with this type of pool that is in a park like setting than a conventional aquatics facility. Another trend that is growing more popular in the aquatic’s field is the development of a raised temperature therapy pool for relaxation, socialization, and rehabilitation. This has been effective in bringing in swimmers who are looking for a different experience and non-swimmers who want the advantages of warm water in a different setting. The development of natural landscapes has enhanced this type of amenity and created a pleasant atmosphere for adult socialization. The multi-function indoor aquatic center concept of delivering aquatics services continues to grow in acceptance with the idea of providing for a variety of aquatics activities and programs in an open design setting that features a lot of natural light, interactive play features and access to an outdoor sun deck. The placing of traditional instructional/competitive pools, with shallow depth/interactive leisure pools and therapy water, in the same facility has been well received in the market. This idea has proven to be financially successful by centralizing pool operations for recreation service providers and through increased generation of revenues from patrons willing to pay for an aquatics experience that is new and exciting. Indoor aquatic centers have been instrumental in developing a true family appeal for community-based facilities. The keys to success for this type of center revolve around the concept of intergenerational use in a quality facility that has an exciting and vibrant feel in an outdoor like atmosphere. Also changing is the orientation of aquatic centers from stand-alone facilities that only have aquatic features to more of a full-service recreation center that has fitness, sports and community based amenities. This change has allowed for a better rate of cost recovery and stronger rates of use of the aquatic portion of the facility as well as the other “dry side” amenities. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 52 Aquatic Facilities Market Orientation: Based on the market information, the existing pools, and typical aquatic needs within a community, there are specific market areas that need to be addressed with any aquatic facility. These include: 1. Leisure/recreation aquatic activities - This includes a variety of activities found at leisure pools with zero depth entry, warm water, play apparatus, slides, seating areas and deck space. These are often combined with other non-aquatic areas such as concessions and birthday party or other group event areas. 2. Instructional programming - The primary emphasis is on teaching swimming and lifesaving skills to many different age groups. These activities have traditionally taken place in more conventional pool configurations but should not be confined to just these spaces. Reasonably warm water, shallow depth with deeper water (4 ft. or more), and open expanses of water are necessary for instructional activities. Easy pool access, a viewing area for parents, and deck space for instructors is also crucial. 3. Fitness programming - These types of activities continue to grow in popularity among a large segment of the population. From aqua exercise classes, to lap swimming times, these programs take place in more traditional settings that have lap lanes and large open expanses of water available at a 3 1/2 to 5 ft. depth. 4. Therapy – A growing market segment for many aquatic centers is the use of warm, shallow water for therapy and rehabilitation purposes. Many of these services are offered by medically based organizations that partner with the center for this purpose. 5. Competitive swimming/diving - Swim team competition and training for youth, adults and seniors requires a traditional 6 to 10 lane pool with a 1 and/or 3 meter diving boards at a length of 25 yards or 50 meters. Ideally, the pool depth should be no less than 4 ft. deep at the turn end and 6 feet for starts (7 is preferred). Spectator seating and deck space for staging meets is necessary. This market usually has strong demands for competitive pool space and time during prime times of center use. 6. Specialized uses – Activities such as water polo and synchronized swimming can also take place in competitive pool areas as long as the pool is deep enough (7 ft. minimum) and the pool area is large enough. However, these are activities that have small participant numbers and require relatively large pool areas. As a result, it may be difficult to meet the needs of specialized uses on a regular basis. 7. Social/relaxation - The appeal of using an aquatics area for relaxation has become a primary focus of many aquatic facilities. This concept has been very effective in drawing non-swimmers to aquatic facilities and expanding the market beyond the traditional MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 53 swimming boundaries. The use of natural landscapes and creative pool designs that integrate the social elements with swimming activities has been most effective in reaching this market segment. 8. Special events/rentals - There is a market for special events including kid’s birthday parties, corporate events, community organization functions, and general rentals to outside groups. The development of this market will aid in the generation of additional revenues and these events/rentals can often be planned for after or before regular hours or during slow use times. It is important that special events or rentals not adversely affect daily operations or overall center use. Specific market segments include: 1. Families - Within this market, an orientation towards family activities is essential. The ability to have family members of different ages participate in a fun and vibrant facility is essential. 2. Pre-school children - The needs of pre-school age children need to be met with very shallow or zero depth water which is warm and has play apparatus designed for their use. Interactive programming involving parents and toddlers can also be conducted in more traditional aquatic areas as well. 3. School age youth - A major focus of most pools is to meet the needs of this age group from recreational swimming to competitive aquatics. The leisure components such as slides, fountains, lazy rivers and zero depth will help to bring these individuals to the pool on a regular basis for drop-in recreational swimming. The lap lanes provide the opportunity and space necessary for instructional programs and aquatic team use. 4. Teens - Another aspect of many pools is meeting the needs of the teenage population. Serving the needs of this age group will require leisure pool amenities that will keep their interest (slides) as well as the designation of certain “teen” times of use. 5. Adults – This age group has a variety of needs from aquatic exercise classes to lap swimming, triathlon training and competitive swimming through the master’s program. 6. Seniors - As the population of the United States and the service area continues to age, meeting the needs of an older senior population will be essential. A more active and physically oriented senior is now demanding services to ensure their continued health. Aqua exercise, lap swimming, therapeutic conditioning and even learn to swim classes have proven to be popular with this age group. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 54 7. Special needs population - This is a secondary market, but with the A.D.A. requirements and the existence of shallow warm water and other components, the amenities are present to develop programs for this population segment. Association with a hospital and other therapeutic and social service agencies will be necessary to reach this market. 8. Special interest groups - These include swim teams (and other aquatic teams), school district teams, day care centers and social service organizations. While the needs of these groups can be great, their demands on an aquatics center can often be incompatible with the overall mission of the facility. Care must be taken to ensure that special interest groups are not allowed to dictate use patterns for the center. With the proper pools and strong utilization of the aquatics area, it is possible to meet most of the varied market orientations as outlined above. Recreation Activity and Facility Trends: There continues to be very strong growth in the number of people participating in recreation and leisure activities. The Physical Activity Council in its 2013 study indicated that 33% of Americans (age 6 and older) are active to a healthy level. However, the study also indicated that 28% of Americans were inactive. It is estimated that one in five Americans over the age of six participates in some form of fitness related activity at least once a week. American Sports Data, Inc. reported that membership in U.S. health clubs has increased by 10.8% from 2009 to 2010, and memberships in health clubs reached an all-time high of 50.2 million in 2010. Statistics also indicate that approximately 12 out of every 100 people of the U.S. population (or 12%) belong to a health club. On the other side most public recreation centers attract between 20% and 30% of a market area (more than once) during the course of a year. All of this indicates the relative strength of a market for a community recreation facility. However, despite these increases the American population as a whole continues to lead a rather sedentary life with an average of 25% of people across the country reporting that they engage in no physical activity (according to The Center for Disease Control). One of the areas of greatest participant growth over the last 10 years is in fitness related activities such as exercise with equipment, aerobic exercise and group cycling. This is also the most volatile area of growth with specific interest areas soaring in popularity for a couple of years only to be replaced by a new activity for the coming years. Also showing particularly strong growth numbers are ice hockey and running/jogging while swimming participation remains consistently high despite recent drops in overall numbers. It is significant that many of the activities that can take place in an indoor recreation setting are ranked in the top fifteen in overall participation by the National Sporting Goods Association. Due to the increasing recreational demands there has been a shortage in most communities of the following spaces: MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 55  Gymnasiums  Pools (especially leisure pools)  Weight/cardiovascular equipment areas  Indoor running/walking tracks  Meeting/multipurpose (general program) space  Senior’s program space  Pre-school and youth space  Teen use areas  Fieldhouses As a result, many communities have attempted to include these amenities in public community recreation facilities. With the growth in youth sports and the high demand for school gyms, most communities are experiencing an acute lack of gymnasium space. Weight/cardiovascular space is also in high demand and provides a facility with the potential to generate significant revenues. The success of most recreation departments is dependent on meeting the recreational needs of a variety of individuals. The fastest growing segment of society is the senior population and meeting the needs of this group is especially important now and will only grow more so in the coming years. Indoor walking tracks, exercise areas, pools and classroom spaces are important to this age group. Marketing to the younger more active senior (usually age 55-70) is paramount, as this age group has the free time available to participate in leisure activities, the desire to remain fit, and more importantly the disposable income to pay for such services. Youth programming has always been a cornerstone for recreation services and will continue to be so with an increased emphasis on teen needs and providing a deterrent to juvenile crime. With a continuing increase in single parent households and two working parent families, the needs of school age children for before and after school child care continues to grow as does the need for preschool programming. As more and more communities attempt to develop community recreation facilities the issues of competition with other providers in the market area have inevitably been raised. The loudest objections have come from the private health club market and their industry voice IHRSA. The private sector has vigorously contended that public facilities unfairly compete with them in the market and have spent considerable resources attempting to derail public projects. However, the reality is that in most markets where public community recreation centers have been built, the private sector has not been adversely affected and in fact in many cases has continued to grow. This is due in large part to the fact that public and private providers serve markedly different markets. One of the other issues of competition comes from the non-profit sector (primarily YMCA's but also JCC’s, and others), where the market is much closer to that of the public providers. While not as vociferous as the private providers, the non-profits have also often expressed concern over public community recreation centers. What has resulted from this is a MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 56 strong growth in the number of partnerships that have occurred between the public and non-profit sector in an attempt to bring the best recreation amenities to a community. Community Center Benchmarks: Based on market research conducted by Ballard*King & Associates at community centers across the United States, the following represents the basic benchmarks.  The majority of community centers that are being built today are between 65,000 and 75,000 square feet. Most centers include three primary components A) A pool area usually with competitive and leisure amenities, B) Multipurpose gymnasium space, and C) Weight/cardiovascular equipment area. In addition, most centers also have group exercise rooms, drop-in childcare, and classroom and/or community spaces.  For most centers to have an opportunity to cover all of their operating expenses with revenues, they must have a service population of at least 30,000 and an aggressive fee structure.  Most centers that are between 65,000 and 75,000 square feet have an operati ng budget of between $1,500,000 and $1,800,000 annually. Nearly 65% of the operating costs are from personnel services, followed by approximately 25% for contractual services, 8% for commodities, and 2% for capital replacement.  For centers that serve a more urban population and have a market driven fee structure, they should be able to recover 70% to 100% of operating expenses. For centers in more rural areas the recovery rate is generally 50% to 75%. Facilities that can consistently cover all of their operating expenses with revenues are rare. The first true benchmark year of operation does not occur until the third full year of operation.  The majority of centers of the size noted (and in an urban environment) above average daily paid attendance of 800 to as much as 1,000 per day. These centers will also typically sell between 800 and 1,500 annual passes (depending on the fee structure and marketing program).  It is common for most centers to have a three-tiered fee structure that offers daily, extended visit (usually punch cards) passes, and annual passes. In urban areas it is common to have resident and non-resident fees. Non-resident rates can cost 25% to 50% higher than the resident rate and are usually a topic of discussion amongst elected officials. Daily rates for residents average between $3.00 and $6.00 for adults, $3.00 and $4.00 for youth and the same for seniors. Annual rates for residents average between $200 and $300 for adults, and $100 and $200 for youth and seniors. Family annual passes tend to be heavily discounted and run between $350 and $800. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 57  Most centers are open an average of 105 hours a week, with weekday hours being 5:00 am to 10:00 pm, Saturdays 8:00 am to 8:00 pm and Sundays from noon to 8:00 pm. There is now a trend to open earlier on Sundays as well. Often hours are shorter during the summer months. Note: These statistics vary by regions of the country. Tri-Cities Area Aquatic Facilities Assessment: Within the Tri-Cities area there are a limited number of indoor and outdoor pools to serve a large population base. Public and Non-Profit Providers It is almost impossible to imagine that in a market area of over 220,000 people that there is not a single indoor public or non-profit pool. The closest public indoor pools are located to the south in Hermiston, Oregon or to the northwest in Yakima. The first true indoor competitive pool (10 lane by 25 yard) that is large enough to host a significant swim meet is located even further north in Ellensburg at Central Washington University. While there are not any indoor public pools in the market area, there are a significant number of outdoor public pools in the Tri-Cities area. This includes: City of Pasco – The City has one outdoor community pool, Memorial Pool, which is a 50 meter and a small leisure pool with slides. This pool was rebuilt in 2009 and it is utilized extensively by the Channel Cats swim team during the summer months. In the last several years, the City closed two very small neighborhood based rectangular pools (Richardson Pool and Kurtzman Pool). City of Richland – The City operates the George Prout Memorial Pool which features a 6 lane x 25 yard tank with an attached diving well with a 1 and 3 meter board. The City also operates Badger Mountain Splash and Play which is a nearly 6,000 sq.ft. water playground. City of Kennewick – The City has one outdoor pool, the Kenneth Serier Memorial Pool, which is a 6 lane x 25 yard pool, separate diving pool with two 1 meter boards, wading pool and splash pad. There is also a concession area associated with the pool. The City also has a splash pool at the Civic Center and three aquatic playgrounds (Grange, Columbia and Underwood parks). Many years ago the YMCA operated an indoor pool and the Navy had an indoor 50 meter pool as well. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 58 Pasco Memorial Pool Kenneth Serier Memorial Pool Private The other provider of aquatics facilities is the private sector. With the lack of public indoor facilities, the private sector has taken on the unusual role of being the primary provider of indoor aquatic facilities in the Tri-Cities area. Columbia Basin Racquet Club – This large multifaceted health club located in Richland has an indoor 4 lane x 25 meter lap pool with a hot tub. There is also an outdoor 5 lane x 25 meter pool that is bubbled in the winter to provide a second indoor pool. The 5 lane pool is utilized by the Channel Cats swim team during the winter months. Tri-City Court Club – This is also a large health club that is located in Kennewick. It features an indoor 4 lane x 25 yard lap pool with a hot tub as well as a 5 lane x 25 yard pool that is used extensively by the Channel Cats. In addition, the club also has a significant outdoor leisure pool that has been built in a small area but it does contain slides and interactive water features. Kia Ora Fitness – This is a smaller health club that is located in Kennewick but it does have a 4 lane x 25 meter lap pool that is also utilized by the Channel Cats swim team on occasions. Gold’s Gym – This Kennewick health club has a 3 lane lap pool as part of its facility. LifeQuest – Located across the parking lot from the TRAC, this health club has recently built an indoor pool with a number of lap lanes. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 59 Columbia Basin Racquet Club Pool Tri-City Court Club Pool In addition to the private pools that are noted above, many HOA’s in the Tri-Cities area also have small outdoor pools that are available to their residents. At one time there was also a large private outdoor water park (Oasis Water Park) which has since closed. However, there is a plan to possibly develop an indoor water park as part of a hotel (the project would be called Bahama Breeze) similar to the Great Wolf Lodge concept. This type of facility has very little appeal to locals since an overnight stay at the hotel is generally required to use the water park. Tri-Cities Aquatic Facilities Summary: The following is a summary of the Tri-Cities area aquatic facilities market.  There are no public indoor swimming pools located within the immediate Tri-Cities area. There are also no non-profit indoor aquatic facilities.  Each of the cities in the area has outdoor swimming pools and there are a number of splash pads located within Pasco, Kennewick and Richland.  There are not any true public, family focused, outdoor recreation pools in the market area. The only facility of this nature is located at Tri-City Court Club.  The private health clubs in the area have had to fill the role of indoor aquatic facility providers for the public as well as for most swim teams.  With the lack of indoor pools there are a very limited number of high school swim teams and the USA team is limited in its size. There is also no way that any indoor swim meets can be hosted in the area which further limits competitive swimming.  The public outdoor pools have very low fees for use and the private health clubs are not charging significant fees for swim team use of their facilities. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 60 Pasco Recreation Facilities Assessment: In addition to aquatics, it is possible that the new facility may have some “dry side” amenities. As a result, it is important to understand the market for general indoor recreation facilities in Pasco. While an aquatic center may have a draw within the greater Tri-Cities area, it is anticipated that the “dr y side” amenities will primarily appeal to Pasco residents. Within Pasco there are a number of indoor sports, recreation and fitness facilities available. Public The City of Pasco currently has three indoor facilities that are utilized for recreation purposes. Senior Center – This facility is going to close in the very near future. The center has a game room, computer lab, small library and a big multi-purpose room with a commercial kitchen. The senior meal program will move to a new facility near City Hall. City Hall Gym – Since City Hall was once Pasco High School, a gym still exists on site. The gym is utilized by parks and recreation for a variety of programs. MLK Gym – This gym is primarily programmed by the YMCA. In addition to these facilities there are several other public centers. Pasco School District – The schools have a number of gyms and other facilities that are utilized by parks and recreation and other community organizations. Columbia Basin College – The college has two indoor racquetball courts. TRAC Center – Although this is really not a recreation facility, it is a large events center that hosts a variety of activities. It is owned and operated by Franklin County. Senior Center City Hall Gym MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 61 In addition to these facilities, Richland has a new community center and there is the Southridge Sports Pavilion in Kennewick. Private The other major provider of recreation, sports and fitness facilities is the private sector. While there are a significant number of private health clubs in the Tri-Cities area, most of these are in the Richland and Kennewick area. The following health clubs are located in Pasco. LifeQuest – This is the most comprehensive health club in Pasco and in addition to having indoor aquatics, the facility also has a strong fitness orientation as well as a gym, climbing wall and an indoor turf field. Broadmoor Fitness – This is a fitness center that offers a variety of group exercise classes as well as personal training. Wolfpack Women’s Fitness – This is a fitness center that focuses on women and it has a significant weight/cardio area as well as group exercise studios. In addition to these facilities, the other major private health clubs in the Tri-Cities area includes the Columbia Basin Racquet Club, Tri-City Court Club and Kia Ora Fitness. Pasco Recreation Facilities Summary: The following is a summary of the Pasco area indoor recreation facilities market.  There is no true public community recreation center in Pasco with only smaller, single use facilities.  The City of Pasco will be closing their senior center soon. This facility featured a large multi-purpose room and a commercial kitchen.  LifeQuest is the only comprehensive private health club in Pasco proper. Market Opportunities - Based on the other aquatic, recreation, sports and fitness facilities located in Pasco and the Tri-Cities area, the following are market opportunities for a Pasco Aquatic/Recreation Center.  There are no public indoor pools in the greater Tri-Cities market area. This has limited the growth of competitive swimming as well as other forms of aquatic programming. There is a very strong market for not only an indoor competitive pool but also for a facility that will draw the recreational swimmers in the area. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 62  The City of Pasco does not have a comprehensive indoor recreation center to serve residents needs and the senior center will be closing.  The vast majority of private health clubs are located in Richland and Kennewick leaving a larger market in Pasco.  Pasco’s Memorial Pool serves the need for seasonal long course competitive swimming (50-meter distance).  There are very limited outdoor leisure oriented aquatic facilities in the market leaving an outstanding market for this type of facility.  With a population of almost 72,000 in the Primary Service Area, the market is more than large enough to support a significant indoor and outdoor public aquatic center and an indoor recreation center. The population is younger, has households with children and reasonable household income levels. The population is expected to continue to grow at a strong rate.  The proposed site for the aquatic/recreation center is easily accessible to people throughout the Tri-Cities area.  The warm summer weather is advantageous to an outdoor aquatic element to the facility. Market Constraints – In addition to the market opportunities, it is also important to analyze possible market constraints. These include.  The fees being paid at most facilities for recreational swimming are at the low end of the spectrum that will not allow for a more aggressive fee structure at a new Pasco facility.  Most competitive swim teams are also paying very low fees for the use of pools. This will also affect the fees that will be able to be charged at a new competitive pool.  The City of Pasco does have two existing gyms that are currently being utilized for recreation programming.  LifeQuest is a significant private center that offers not only fitness but also has indoor aquatics, a gym and an indoor turf area. MARKET ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Page 63  The proposed site is at the far north end of Pasco making access from the southern area of the city more difficult.  Despite the excellent market for a Pasco Aquatic/Recreation Center, the reality is that the facility will likely not be able to cover its cost of operation by revenues generated from the facility. The extent of the operational loss will be dependent on the amenities that are ultimately included in the facilit y and the mix between aquatic and “dry side” amenities. Even with the presence of a number of existing pools and indoor recreation, sports and fitness facilities, there is still an outstanding market for a significant, publicly owned, aquatic/recreation center in Pasco. To be financially viable, the aquatic center will need to have a focus on recreational swimming (slides, interactive play features, and shallow water) as well as more traditional aquatic activities (lap swimming, competitive swimming, lessons and fitness). There will also need to be a high level of aquatic programming offered as well. In additi on, there will need to be an, outdoor, recreationally focused aquatic center that will limit operational costs and maximize revenues. It is also recommended that the facility include other “dry side” amenities such as a gym space and possibly even fitness. Page 64 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Section II - Operations Analysis An operations analysis that has been completed for the proposed Pasco Aquatic/Recreation Center. The following are the basic parameters for the project.  This operations budget includes the first phase of the facility (no indoor 8 lane lap pool).  The first year of operation will be late 2019 or later.  This operational budget represents new expenses and revenues only.  The presence of other providers in the market will remain the same.  The center will be operated by the City of Pasco.  The site is basically at I-82 and Broadmoor Blvd.  This operations estimate is based on a program and basic concept plan for the facility only.  No partnerships with other organizations have been shown in this operations plan.  Capital replacement dollars are shown.  There will be a substantial concession operation for the outdoor portion of the aquatic center.  A reasonably aggressive approach to estimating the sale of annual passes, and revenues from programs and services taking place at the facility has been used for this pro-forma.  Sales tax payments have not been shown but are assumed to be collected and passed on directly to the state.  This preliminary operations analysis should be updated when a final design for the act ual center is completed. Page 65 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Division I - Expenditures Expenditures have been formulated based on the costs that are typically included in the operating budget for this type of facility. The figures are based on the size of the center, the specific components of the facility and the projected hours of operati on. Actual costs were utilized wherever possible and estimates for other expenses were based on similar facilities in the Pacific Northwest. All expenses were calculated as accurately as possible but the actual costs may vary based on the final design, operational philosophy, and programming considerations adopted by staff. Facility Description – An indoor aquatic/recreation center and outdoor aquatic center. The indoor center includes a leisure pool, gym, elevated track, weight/cardio area, community room, party rooms, child watch, and the required support spaces. There is also be a seasonal outdoor leisure pool and slide. Approximately 36,000 sq.ft. indoor Operation Cost Model: Personnel Full-Time $506,250 Part-Time $1,328,885 TOTAL $1,835,135 Commodities Office Supplies (forms, paper, etc.) $12,000 Chemicals (pool) $70,000 Maintenance/Repair/Materials $30,000 Janitor Supplies $20,000 Rec. Supplies $50,000 Uniforms $10,000 Printing/Postage $25,000 Items for Resale $15,000 Concession (food & supplies) $65,000 Other $5,000 TOTAL $302,000 Page 66 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Contractual Utilities (electric and gas)15 $234,000 Water/Sewer $60,000 Insurance (property & liability) $50,000 Communications (phone) $8,000 Contract Services16 $60,000 Rent Equipment $5,000 Marketing/Advertising $40,000 Training (staff time) $10,000 Conference $5,000 Trash Pickup $5,000 Dues & Subscriptions $1,500 Bank Charges (charge cards, EFT) $30,000 Other $5,000 TOTAL $513,500 Capital Replacement Fund $50,000 TOTAL $50,000 All Categories Personnel $1,835,135 Commodities $302,000 Contractual $513,500 Capital $50,000 TOTAL EXPENSE $2,700,635 NOTE: Line items not included in this budget are off-site maintenance and any vehicle costs. 15 Rates are $4.00 SF and include electric and natural gas plus $90,000 for the outdoor aquatics area. It should be noted that rates for electricity and gas have been very volatile and could result in higher cost for utilities over time. 16 Contract services cover maintenance contracts, control systems work, alarm, and other services. Page 67 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Staffing Levels: Full-Time Positions Positions Total Center Manager 1 $65,000 Aquatics Supervisor 1 $55,000 Recreation Supervisor-Fitness 1 $45,000 Maintenance Foreman 1 $50,000 Custodian 1 $40,000 Front Desk Supervisor 1 $40,000 Head Lifeguard/Instructor 2 @ $40,000 ea. $80,000 Salaries $375,000 Benefits (35%) $131,250 TOTAL 8 F.T.E. $506,250 Note: Pay rates were determined based on City of Pasco’s job classifications and wage scales for similar positions. The positions listed are necessary to ensure adequate staffing for the facility’s operation. The wage scales for both the full-time and part-time staff positions reflect an anticipated wage for 2019. Page 68 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Part-Time Positions Rate/Hour Hours/Week Front Desk Supervisor $17.00 69 Front Desk Attendant $15.00 109 Weight Room Attendant $15.00 109 Child Watch Attendant $15.00 102 Gym Attendant (26 weeks) $15.00 46 Custodian $16.00 75 Lifeguard-Indoor $16.00 364 Outdoor Pool (14 weeks) Cashier $15.00 98 Head Lifeguard $17.00 84 Lifeguard-Outdoor $16.00 1,010 Concession Supervisor $17.00 56 Concession Attendant $15.00 168 Custodian $16.00 140 Program Instructors17 Aquatics Variable $55,035 General Variable $112,510 Salaries $1,208,077 Benefits (10%) $120,808 TOTAL $1,328,885 17 Program instructors are paid at several different pay rates and some are also paid per class or in other ways. This makes an hourly breakdown difficult. Aquatics includes lessons, fitness and other activities. General programs consist of fitness, sports leagues, general programs, birthday parties and other activities. Page 69 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Division II - Revenues The following revenue projections were formulated from information on the specifics of the project and the demographics of the service area as well as comparing them to state and national statistics, other similar facilities and the competition for recreation services in the area. Actual figures will vary based on the size and make-up of the components selected during final design, market stratification, philosophy of operation, fees and charges policy, and priorities of use. Revenue Projection Model: Fees Daily Fees Regular $108,000 Daily Fees Summer $553,500 10 Admissions $40,500 Summer Passes $404,115 Annual Passes18 $632,325 Corporate/Group $35,000 Rentals19 $52,190 TOTAL $1,825,630 Programs Aquatics $89,918 General $199,424 TOTAL $289,342 18 Figures are based on an active program to promote the sale of annual passes. 19 Rentals are based on the following: Page 70 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Other Child Watch Fees $12,000 Resale Items $22,500 Special Events $4,500 Vending $18,000 Concession/Food Service $122,000 TOTAL $179,000 All Categories Fees $1,825,630 Programs $289,342 Other $179,000 TOTAL REVENUE $2,293,972 Page 71 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Division III - Expenditure - Revenue Comparison Category Expenditures $2,700,635 Revenues $2,293,972 Difference -$406,663 Recovery Rate 85% This operations pro-forma was completed based on general information and a basic understanding of the project with only a preliminary concept plan for the center. As a result, there is no guarantee that the expense and revenue projections outlined above will be met as there are many variables that affect such estimates that either cannot be accurately measured or are not consistent in their influence on the budgetary process. Future Years: Revenue growth in the first three years is attributed to increased market penetration and in the remaining years to continued population growth. In most recreation facilities the first three years show tremendous growth from increasing the market share of patrons who use such facilities, but at the end of this time period revenue growth begins to flatten out. Additional revenue growth is then spurred through increases in the population within the market area, a specific marketing plan to develop alternative markets, the addition of new amenities or by increasing user fees. Page 72 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Division IV - Fees and Attendance Projected Fee Schedule: Revenue projections and attendance numbers were calculated from this fee model. Category Daily 10 Admiss Summer Annual Adult (18+) $9.00 $80 $95 $275 Teen (13-17) $8.00 $70 $85 $225 Youth (4-12) $7.00 $60 $75 $190 Senior (65+) $7.00 $60 $75 $190 Family20 N/A N/A $185 $550 Annual passes include land and water based fitness classes plus child watch. Fitness Classes $9/class Child Watch $3/class Admission Rate Comparisons: The above rates were determined based on other providers in the area and the rates paid at similar facilities in the greater market area. 20 Includes 2 adults and up to 3 youth under 18 living in the same home. Each additional youth is $50 for a summer pass and $75 for an annual pass. Page 73 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Attendance Projections: The following attendance projections are the basis for the revenue figures that were identified earlier in this report. The admission numbers are affected by the rates being charged, the facilities available for use and the competition within the service area. The figures are also based on the performance of other similar facilities in the area. These are averages only and the yearly figures are based on 360 days of operation for the indoor pool and 90 days for the outdoor. Yearly Paid Admissions Description Facility Daily 50 admissions/day 13,500 Daily-Summer 800 admissions/day 72,000 10 Admissions 600 sold annually 6,000 Summer 2,579 sold annually 67,054 Annual 1,379 sold annually 143,416 Total Yearly 301,970 Total Daily 839 These attendance projections are for paid admissions to the center and do not include individuals who would be present strictly for programs, swim meets, and rentals. NOTE: The 2,579 summer passes are based on selling to approximately 5% of the households (24,169 estimated in 2020) in the Primary Service Area and 2% in the Secondary Service Area (68,547 estimated in 2020). The 1,379 annual passes are based on selling to approximately 5% of the households (24,169 estimated in 2020) in the Primary Service Area and one quarter of a percent in the Secondary Service Area (68,547 estimated in 2020). Annual passes are based on 104 admissions a year and summer passes on 26 admissions. Family passes are counted as one admission. Page 74 OPERATIONS ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Division V – Hours of Operation The projected hours of operation of the Pasco Aquatic/Recreation Center are as follows: Days Center Hours Outdoor Hours Monday-Friday 5:00am-10:00pm 11:00am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-8:00pm 11:00am-7:00pm Sunday 8:00am-8:00pm 11:00am-7:00pm Hours per Week 109 56 Note: The outdoor aquatic center season is projected to be from Memorial Day to Labor Day with reduced hours of operation on weekdays (afternoons only) when schools are in session. Page 75 PARTNERSHIP ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Section IV – Partnership Assessment A significant number of new public aquatic/recreation facilities now involve some form of partnership with other community organizations and recreation service providers. For partnerships to be effective the following must occur.  Must actively pursue and sell the benefits of the partnership.  Weigh the benefits vs. the cost of the partnership.  Don’t compromise on the original vision and mission of the project.  Establish a shared partnership vision.  Expect compromises to meet different needs and expectations.  Clearly define development and operations requirements. An important step in determining the feasibility of developing a new aquatic/recreation center in Pasco is to assess the partnership opportunities that may exist. There are a number of organizations and entities that could possibly be partners for the aquatic/recreation center. These include:  YMCA  Pasco School District  Franklin County  Columbia Basin College  Community and other Non-Profit Organizations  Health Care Provider  Private Health Clubs  Retail Sales  Aquatic/Sports Organizations  Business and Corporate Community  Developer The following is a general summary of the partnership assessment and recommendations for how to proceed with partnering on an aquatic/recreation center. Page 76 PARTNERSHIP ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Specific Project Roles – After reviewing the partnering assessment for each organization the partnerships can be categorized into three possible levels. Primary or Equity Project Partners – These would be the possible main partners in a project who have the most interest, the ability to fund, and a willingness to be a part of the development and operation of a facility. Realistically there are limited partnerships at this level.  Developer – With the likelihood that the aquatic/recreation center will be located as part of a larger development site in the community, having the developer as an equity partner in the project should be expected. This could include providing property for the facility at a reduced fee and/or the assistance in bringing basic infrastructure to the site. It should not be expected that the developer will actually provide capital for the development of the center itself.  YMCA – Working with the YMCA to form a partnership to develop the aquatic/recreation center is possible. The Y usually takes on the role of the operator of the facility more than being a major capital funder. However, asking the YMCA to assist with fundraising to augment tax funding for the center should be expected.  Private Health Club – A partnership would most likely be in the form of the City leasing land at a very low rate and the club building a private fitness center. A successful partnership of this nature would require the private firm or the City to also construct the aquatics and community spaces that are typically included in community centers (leisure pool, community space, classrooms, etc.). This facility would not be a “community center” without these additional spaces. Operational responsibility and funding will also need to be determined for these amenities. It is unlikely that this development option will be realistic due to the amenity requirements and the loss of control over the project by the City. Also a partnership of this nature would virtually eliminate inclusion of other equity partners. If this option is to be seriously explored, then the City would most likely need to issue an RFP to determine the level of interest and the financial realities.  Medical Service Providers – With a well-equipped fitness center, and a warm water pool, there should be a market to attract medical service providers to utilize the facility for rehabilitation purposes. There will need to be a strong effort to develop a contract with these providers to use the center during slower times of use. There may also be the possibility of including dedicated lease space for a therapy or sports medicine clinic within the building. Page 77 PARTNERSHIP ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Secondary Project Partners – These organizations could have a direct interest in the aquatic/recreation center project but not to the same level as a primary partner. Capital funding for the project is unlikely but there could be some assistance with program and service delivery.  Pasco School District – The school district’s role in the project would be limited but if the center includes a new competitive pool in the second phase, the District could be a primary user group for the amenity. It is highly unlikely that there would be any capital contribution for construction or funding for operations (beyond possible fees for pool use).  Columbia Basin College – The college is in close proximity to the potential site for the center and making the facility available to students and staff could increase overall utilization and revenues. Also, for operations of the center, the college could possibility provide work study students that would give the facility some inexpensive staffing options.  Retail Sales – It may be possible to integrate some local retail services into the aquatic/ recreation center. This could come in the area of a small drink/food service operation and/or a small area to sell sports, recreation and fitness goods if the City decides not to operate these amenities themselves. The center should either lease space in the building for these purposes or take a percentage of any goods that are sold. The location of the center will ultimately determine the value and demand for these types of services.  Other Recreation Service Providers – In an effort to offer a wide variety of programs and services, partnering with select outside recreation providers is encouraged. These services should be offered on a contract basis with a split of gross revenues at a rate of 70% for the vendor and 30% for the center. These other providers could include the private fitness providers and other individuals and organizations. The key factor with the secondary partners is to determine what programs and services are most appropriate for this delivery method realizing that there is the potential for overlapping services. Support Partners – These organizations support the development of a new aquatic/recreation center but would see limited to no direct involvement in the development or operation of the facility.  Franklin County – The role of the county in an aquatic/recreation center project is limited and would most likely not involve any capital or operations funding. However, this type of facility will improve the quality of life for not only City of Pasco residents but also people that live in the County. It should be expected that Franklin County would endorse the project and publicly support its development.  Sports Organizations – Local sports organizations could be primary users of a new aquatic/recreation center if the amenities that they need are available (gymnasiums, Page 78 PARTNERSHIP ANALYSIS Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * competitive pool, etc.) and support their activities. It should be expected that these groups would be strong supporters of a center and would pay for their use of the facility.  Community Organizations – Developing working relationships with community organizations and service clubs could provide much needed support for the project as well as generate possible users of the facility.  Business and Corporate Community – It is important to approach the corporate community with a variety of sponsorship opportunities to enhance the revenue prospects of the center. Support partners would have a limited impact on the development and operation of a Pasco Aquatic/Recreation Center, but their involvement in the process should still be a priority to build overall awareness of the project and help promote their use. As possible on-going users of the facility they could provide a solid revenue stream for the amenities. As the new aquatic/recreation center becomes closer to reality, the opportunities for partnering will increase. A well written partnership agreement will need to be drafted between any organizations involved in the project. The agreement should clearly outline the capital funding requirements, project ownership, priorities of use/pricing, operating structure, facility maintenance and long-term capital funding plan. These agreements must be approved prior to committing to begin design or construction of the facility. Page 79 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Section V - Appendix Operations Analysis Part-Time Staff Hours Program Expense/Revenue Projections Admission Revenue Projections Page 80 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * General Staff Part Time Hours Front Desk Supervisor Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 5am-2pm 9 1 5 45 2pm-5pm 3 0 5 0 5pm-10pm 5 0 5 0 Saturday/Sunday 8am-1pm 5 1 2 10 1pm-8pm 7 1 2 14 Total 69 Front Desk Attendant Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 5am-Noon 7 1 5 35 Noon-5pm 5 1 5 25 5pm-10pm 5 1 5 25 Saturday/Sunday 8am-1pm 5 1 2 10 1pm-8pm 7 1 2 14 Total 109 Weight Room Attendant Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 5am-Noon 7 1 5 35 Noon-5pm 5 1 5 25 5pm-10pm 5 1 5 25 Saturday/Sunday 8am-1pm 5 1 2 10 1pm-8pm 7 1 2 14 Total 109 Custodian/Attend Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 5am-1pm 8 0 5 0 1pm-10pm 9 1 5 45 Saturday/Sunday 6am-1pm 7 1 2 14 1pm-9pm 8 1 2 16 Total 75 Child Watch Worker Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 8am-1pm 5 2 5 50 4pm-8pm 4 2 5 40 Saturday 10am-4pm 6 2 1 12 Total 102 Gym Attendant Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 3pm-6pm 3 1 5 15 6pm-9pm 3 1 5 15 Saturday/Sunday Noon-8pm 8 1 2 16 Total 46 Page 81 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Aquatic Staff Part Time Hours Indoor Pool Lifeguard Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week School (37 weeks)Mon-Fri 4:30am-8am 3.5 2 5 35 8am-Noon 4 3 5 60 Noon-3pm 3 2 5 30 3pm-6pm 3 5 5 75 6pm-8pm 2 5 5 50 8pm-10pm 2 2 5 20 Saturday/Sunday 7:30am-Noon 4.5 2 2 18 Noon-8pm 8 5 2 80 Total 368 Lifeguard Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Summer (15 weeks)Mon-Fri 4:30am-8am 3.5 2 5 35 8am-Noon 4 3 5 60 Noon-6pm 6 5 5 150 6pm-8pm 2 5 5 50 8pm-10pm 1 2 5 10 Saturday/Sunday 7:30am-Noon 4.5 2 1 9 Noon-8pm 8 5 1 40 Total 354 Total Hours 18,926 Average Hours 364 Outdoor Pool Cashier Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 8am-11am 3 0 5 0 11am-5pm 6 2 5 60 5pm-7pm 2 1 5 10 Sat-Sun 11am-5pm 6 2 2 24 5pm-7pm 2 1 2 4 Total 98 Custodian Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Sun 11am-9pm 10 2 7 140 Total 140 Head Lifeguard Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 8am-11am 3 0 5 0 11am-5pm 6 2 5 60 5pm-7pm 2 0 5 0 Sat-Sun 11am-5pm 6 2 2 24 5pm-7pm 2 0 2 0 Total 84 Lifeguard Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Fri 8am-11am 3 2 5 30 11am-5pm 6 18 5 540 5pm-7pm 2 16 5 160 Sat-Sun 11am-5pm 6 18 2 216 5pm-7pm 2 16 2 64 Total 1010 Concession Supervisor Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Sun 11am-7pm 8 1 7 56 Total 56 Concession Cashier Days Time Total Hours Employees Days Total Hrs. Week Mon-Sun 11am-7pm 8 3 7 168 Total 168 Page 82 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Pasco Aquatic/Recreation Center - General Programs Program Calculations - Expenses Adult Leagues Position Staff Rate/Game Game/Wk Weeks Total Basketball Official 2 $25.00 3 10 1,500$ Scorer 1 $15.00 3 10 450$ Volleyball Official 1 $20.00 3 14 840$ Total 2,790$ Youth Sports Camps Position Staff Rate/Hr Number Hours Total Basketball Coaches 2 $20.00 1 16 640$ Volleyball Coaches 2 $20.00 1 16 640$ Total 1,280$ Youth Sports Clinics Position Staff Rate/Hr Number Hours Total Basketball Coaches 2 $20.00 1 4 160$ Volleyball Coaches 2 $20.00 1 4 160$ Total 320$ Fitness Rate/Class Classes/Week Number of Staff Weeks Total Group Fitness Classes 25.00$ 24 1 52 31,200$ Personal Training 25.00$ 10 1 52 13,000$ Total 44,200$ Birthday Parties Rate/Class Classes/Week Number of Hours Weeks Total Parties 15.00$ 12 2 52 18,720$ Total 18,720$ General Recreation Classes Rate/Class Classes/Week Number of Staff Weeks Total Teen & Youth Classes 20.00$ 6 1 32 3,840$ Adult Classes 20.00$ 6 1 32 3,840$ Senior Classes 20.00$ 6 1 32 3,840$ Summer/Break Day Camp Supervisor 17.00$ 40 1 10 6,800$ Leader 15.00$ 40 4 10 24,000$ Misc. Classes 15.00$ 6 1 32 2,880$ Total 45,200$ Contract/Other -$ Grand Total 112,510$ Page 83 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Program Calculations - Revenues Adult Leagues Teams Fee Seasons Total Basketball 6 450$ 1 2,700$ Volleyball 6 250$ 1 1,500$ Total 4,200$ Youth Sports Camps Participants Fee Seasons Total Basketball 20 100$ 1 2,000$ Volleyball 20 100$ 1 2,000$ Total 4,000$ Youth Sports Clinics Participants Fee Number Total Basketball 20 35$ 1 700$ Volleyball 20 35$ 1 700$ Total 1,400$ Fitness Rate/Class Classes/Week Participants Weeks/sessions Total Group Fitness Classes 9.00$ 24 2 52 22,464$ Personal Training 35.00$ 10 1 52 18,200$ Total 40,664$ Birthday Parties Rate Number Weeks Total Parties 125.00$ 12 52 78,000$ Total 78,000$ General Recreation Classes Rate/Class Classes/Week Participants Weeks/sessions Total Teen & Youth Classes 35.00$ 3 8 4 3,360$ Adult Classes 35.00$ 3 8 4 3,360$ Senior Classes 35.00$ 6 8 4 6,720$ Summer/Break Camp 125.00$ 1 40 10 50,000$ Misc. Classes 35.00$ 6 8 4 6,720$ Total 70,160$ Contract/Other 5,000$ Grand Total 199,424$ Page 84 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * General Rentals Revenues Rate/Hr.Number of Hrs.Weeks Total Child Watch 20$ 1 52 1,040$ Community Rm. (large)40$ 2 52 4,160$ Community Rm. (small)20$ 2 52 2,080$ Community Rm. (entire room/4 hrs)300$ 0.5 52 7,800$ Party Room 20$ 4 52 4,160$ Gymnasium 50$ 5 26 6,500$ Total 25,740$ Page 85 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Pasco Aquatic/Recreation Center - Aquatic Programs Program Calculations - Expenses Learn to Swim Classes Rate/Class Classes/Day Days Weeks Total Summer 16.00$ 22 5 10 17,600$ Spring/Fall 16.00$ 10 2 20 6,400$ Winter 16.00$ 10 2 10 3,200$ Total 27,200$ Water Exercise Rate/Class Classes/Wk Weeks Total Summer 20.00$ 18 14 5,040$ Spring/Fall 20.00$ 9 26 4,680$ Winter 20.00$ 9 12 2,160$ Total 11,880$ Other Rate/Class Classes/Wk Weeks Total Private Lessons 16.00$ 8 45 5,760$ Lifeguard Training 25.00$ 33 3 2,475$ Therapy 25.00$ 4 40 4,000$ Misc.15.00$ 4 50 3,000$ Birthday Parties 15.00$ 4 12 720$ Total 15,955$ Contract/Other -$ Grand Total 55,035$ Program Calculations - Revenues Learn to Swim Classes/Week Fee Participants Sessions Total Summer 22 $60 4 5 26,400$ Spring/Fall 10 $60 4 2 4,800$ Winter 10 $60 4 1 2,400$ -$ Private Lessons 8 $20 1 45 7,200$ Total 40,800$ Water Aerobics Classes/Week Fee Participants Sessions Total Summer 18 $9 3 14 6,804$ Spring/Fall 9 $9 3 26 6,318$ Winter 9 $9 3 12 2,916$ Total 16,038$ Other Classes/Week Fee Participants Sessions Total Lifeguard Training 1 $200 8 3 4,800$ Therapy 4 $12 4 40 7,680$ Misc.4 $12 4 50 9,600$ Birthday Parties 4 $125 1 12 6,000$ Total 28,080$ Contract/Other 5,000$ Grand Total 89,918$ Page 86 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Rentals Revenues Rate/Hr.Number of Hrs.Weeks Total Indoor Pool Leisure Pool $250 0.5 50 6,250.00$ Outdoor Pool Main Pool $350 4 1 1,400.00$ Lazy River $300 4 1 1,200.00$ Umbrella $25 50 12 15,000.00$ Full Pool Area $650 4 1 2,600.00$ Total 26,450.00$ Page 87 APPENDIX Pasco Public Facilities District Aquatic/Recreation Center Feasibility Study * Daily Fees Fees Number Revenue Adult $9.00 20 $180.00 Teen $8.00 10 $80.00 Youth $7.00 5 $35.00 Senior $7.00 15 $105.00 Total 50 $400.00 x 270 days/year Grand Total $108,000.00 Summer Daily Fees Fees Number Revenue Adult $9.00 150 $1,350.00 Teen $8.00 250 $2,000.00 Youth $7.00 350 $2,450.00 Senior $7.00 50 $350.00 Total 800 $6,150.00 x 90 days/year Grand Total $553,500.00 10 Admissions Fees Number Revenue Adult $80.00 150 $12,000.00 Teen $70.00 150 $10,500.00 Youth $60.00 200 $12,000.00 Senior $60.00 100 $6,000.00 Family $0.00 0 $0.00 Total 600 $40,500.00 Summer Passes Fees Number Revenue Adult $95.00 100 $9,500.00 Teen $85.00 200 $17,000.00 Youth $75.00 300 $22,500.00 Senior $75.00 100 $7,500.00 Family $185.00 1,879 $347,615.00 Total 2579 $404,115.00 Annual Passes Fees Number Revenue Adult $275.00 200 $55,000.00 Teen $225.00 25 $5,625.00 Youth $190.00 25 $4,750.00 Senior $190.00 150 $28,500.00 Family $550.00 979 $538,450.00 Total 1379 $632,325.00 Revenue Summary Daily $108,000.00 Summer Daily $553,500.00 10 Admissions $40,500.00 Summer Passes $404,115.00 Annual Passes $632,325.00 Total $1,738,440.00 Pasco Aquatic/Recreation Center Revenue Worksheet